Essential Bird Pedagogy again

Bird Droppings August 23, 2011
Essential Bird Pedagogy again

I am working on some thoughts on raising the bar for students as we tend to do in education. I find it most intriguing that we raise the bar for students mention raising the bar for teachers based on student’s success and all hell breaks loose. We never seem to ask teachers to raise the bar. So my question is how can a student increase in their success if teachers are not increasing on their own as well? In other words what last year produced a certain amount of success will this year produce about the same unless we as teachers change something, try something different or maybe just try a bit harder. Doing the exact same thing will produce the exact same results. I was talking with a fellow teacher after school yesterday for some time about curriculum and it got me thinking.

“The only person who is educated is the one who has learned how to learn and change.” Dr. Carl Rogers, considered the father of humanistic psychology

Carl Rogers in 1969 published a book, Freedom to Learn. You would think that in a country with mandatory public education including in 1974 education for all children with the passing of IDEA that we were free to learn. As I progress in my understanding of experiential learning and John Dewey’s concepts which are tied to the Foxfire Core Practices and my dissertation I am finding learning is a misunderstood word. Rogers in his writing describes two types of learning. Cognitive learning which he calls meaningless corresponds to such learning as many academic functions where memorization is involved vocabulary or multiplication tables. The other type of learning is experiential learning and Rogers calls this significant learning. The key is that experiential learning addresses the needs and wants of the learner.

“Significant learning takes place when the subject matter is relevant to the personal interests of the student.” Carl Rogers

I titled today’s writing as essential Bird pedagogy and granted this has been a long time in the making. Seldom do I even use the word pedagogy which is a favorite of graduate education schools around the country. Vocabulary word number one as you start a masters or specialist degree. As I think back I still have never used the word other than in papers being turned in where sufficient language and vocabulary of the topic were crucial to the structure and format of the paper. As to why it is essential and why use my own name pedagogy is so often described as a blanketing sort of word. As an example a teacher might say my method of teaching falls within the such and such pedagogy from so forth and so on. Pedagogy is how we teach to paraphrase most definitions. How we teach is a unique aspect of who we are and borrowing from Carl Rogers, I have often thought you cannot teach another person how to teach.

“My experience is that I cannot teach another person how to teach. To attempt it is for me, in the long run futile. It seems to me that anything that can be taught to another is relatively inconsequential and has little or no significant influence on behavior. I have come to feel that the only learning which significantly influences behavior is self-discovered self-appropriated learning.” Carl Rogers

As I am reading Carl Rogers words my current research and undertakings in Foxfire lead me back to Core Practice three of the Foxfire Core Practices.

“The work teachers and students do together enables learners to make connections between the classroom work, the surrounding communities, and the world beyond their communities.”

Can I define how I teach, my method in my madness perhaps? I started looking at my own history going back in time and for me now that becomes a foggy glimpse nearly fifty years back when I was in school and when I actually started teaching. All of my early life our family was involved in teaching swimming and Red Cross lifesaving courses. My father was the instructor trainer for the county and as we grew up we went from being students almost sort of evolved into teachers of swimming. Once you attained a certain level of capability my father would have you work one on one with another less adept student.

“Classroom work includes peer teaching, small group work, and teamwork.” Foxfire Core Practice seven

“I find it very rewarding to learn, in groups, in relationships with one person as in therapy, or by myself.” Carl Rogers

“Cooperative/collaborative learning is interactive; as a team member, you: 1. Develop and share a common goal 2. Contribute your understanding of the problem: questions; insights and solutions 3. Respond to, and work to understand, others’ questions, insights and solutions. 4. Each member empowers the other to speak and contribute, and to consider their contributions 5. Are accountable to others, and they are accountable to you 6. Are dependent on others, and they depend on you” Joseph Landsberger, Study Guides and Strategies
As I came up through high school I became a Red Cross instructor and taught swimming and Lifesaving through Boy Scouts, Red Cross and the YMCA. Many of the little tricks of the trade I still use recalling the idioms and anachronisms of my father’s lessons. Sitting on my front counter are little reminder cards FIDO, frequency, intensity, duration and over again. A small card and a simple reminder for students to study although I would add relevance to the learning process as well. My process of becoming a teacher while somewhat planned as I participated in training sessions was very hands on and something I wanted to do.
I started teaching in 1970 or so working in Paoli Pennsylvania with severely disabled children in a private program as in that day and age IDEA was still just a dream. In 1970 many children were not served in public schools. I found it essential to understand the children I was working with and in those days research was still very archaic and for the most part even doctors were recommending residential placement for many of the kids I was working with, as they felt they would never amount to anything anyway. Getting to know a nonverbal child is somewhat of an undertaking and often is an emotional roller coaster. Trying to understand where that child was coming from in their interpretation of the world and how they perceived reality was difficult to say the least. As I look back this aspect of concern and caring was critical to my own development as a teacher and my own essential Bird Pedagogy.

“The belief that all genuine education comes about through experience does not mean that all experiences are genuinely or equally educative.” John Dewey

My teaching and pedagogical journey took me through several colleges and several more teaching jobs which eventually took me to Georgia. In 1975 I began teaching in a small program in Warner Robins Georgia where I was teaching thirteen Learning Disabled teenagers. I was upset as I was handed first and second grade reading books for this group of kids as several were reading on that level. It was just prior to this I found my first Foxfire book in a bookstore in Macon Georgia. Reading the various stories in the Foxfire book and having through my additional reading and own experiences found when something is relevant to a student they tend to learn it far better I needed new reading material for my students.
It was a Monday when I started with magazines of interest to the kids in my class and amazingly enough they went for it. I bought some wrestling, car, hunting and a girl’s magazine or two for my one female student although she was a wrestling fan as well and it changed attitudes and attention spans. By the end of the year reading levels were up and my principal was all ready to order more of her reading books when I broke the news to her. I was not fired and actually was offered a raise and would not have to drive the school bus anymore.

“Significant learning takes place when the subject matter is perceived by the student as having relevance for his own purpose.” Carl Rogers

“From the beginning, learner choice, design, and revision infuses the work teachers and learners do together.” Foxfire Core Practice two

I actually started this topic yesterday but was in and out of meetings, did not get any sleep the night before and then last night I had saved my first paragraphs and notes on my off-line drive and left it at school so here I am finishing in the later hours of the morning what may be a several day effort to describe and define my essential Bird pedagogy. We are in so many ways hoping for a day when fewer people will be in harm’s way but today it is still a dream. Please join me in keeping all in harm’s way on your mind and in your hearts.
namaste
bird

A final look at essential Bird Pedagogy

Bird Droppings August 27, 2010
A final look at essential Bird Pedagogy

“If a university can’t have two out of five of their student-athletes graduate, I don’t know why they’re rewarded with post-season play” Arne Duncan

Over the past few days I have been looking at how I see teaching and instruction and I have wandered about a bit in my efforts. My own style is somewhat radical to say the least. However in ten years my craziness has worked with kids who are not supposed to graduate or succeed according to most. I happen to see this line from Arne Duncan our Secretary of Education and it is amazing how we provide a sense of falsehood through athletics. I am not saying all athletes are poor students by any means. I know many who are honor graduates and scholars in their own right. The greed and competition however at a college level becomes significant. A local college at home games can bring millions to the economy. Many staunch fans never went to college anywhere yet have season tickets and trucks colored in that schools colors and even have the same animal as a pet as the local mascot. A good college football or basketball program is a business not a learning program.

“I think we are lying to children and families when we tell children that they are meeting standards and, in fact, they are woefully unprepared to be successful in high school and have almost no chance of going to a good university and being successful.’ Arne Duncan

We constantly hear on the news how we are behind in education other international programs and countries. Let me start with one of the measures which is the PISA, The Program for International Student Assessment. In 2006 we the USA were ranked fifteenth. I have never heard of or seen this test administered in Georgia. It is a two hour test, multiple choice and essay. It is given every three years to rank countries internationally. Australia is ranked fourth. There are differences between us and them and significant differences. It was 1992 till Australia started inclusion into public schools for disabled students versus 1974 in the US. However there is still a distinct difference between US and literally most of the world in terms of education. Our test scores for example as per NCLB include Students With Disabilities SWD as a subgroup and they are included in final tally of population. A 2% allowance is made for Mentally Impaired students in the total population. Australia in scoring on High School tests etc. does not include SWD in totals as European and Asian Schools do not include either. Most international school systems have in pace a mandatory age cut off 15-17 depending on the territory for example in in Australia. At that point choices are made and or mandated as to higher education technical and or college and or go to work. Throughout Asia this is common practice as it is in many European educational systems.

“If you have great assessments and real-time data for teachers and parents that say these are [the student’s] strengths and weaknesses, that’s a real healthy thing,” Arne Duncan

“The work teachers and learners do together includes rigorous, ongoing assessment and evaluation.” Foxfire Core Practice Nine

‎”We would do away with examinations. They measure the inconsequential type of learning. We would do away with grades and credits for the same reason. We would do away with degrees as a measure of competence partly for the same reason. Another reason is that a degree marks the end or a conclusion of something, and the learner is only interested in continuing the process of learning.” Carl Rogers

I agree with several of my friends that on some concepts Carl Rogers can be a bit off the deep end to a degree. But on this aspect I agree with him that competition as far as learning goes be that grades, test scores, can be inconsequential as to is learning occurring. This would lead to another line from David Purpel yesterday that truly hit me hard.

“Schools have been captured by the concept of accountability, which has been transformed from a notion that schools need to be responsive and responsible to community concerns to one in which numbers are used to demonstrate that schools have met their minimal requirement.” David Purpel, 1989, Department of Curriculum and Educational Foundations, University of North Carolina at Greensboro

We have stripped away that aspect of community from schools in order to have a clear cut and definite number to score and equate whatever it is we are wanting to measure in theory. One of the first things I learned in statistics is that they are at the mercy of the statistician. We can make numbers do whatever we want. Politicians like numbers and test scores and simply things so they can make policy and award lobbyists with nice contracts. Interesting how most educational research that is cited by the National Clearing house for research based materials is primarily 100% publishing and testing company’s research. Much of this is very limited demographically and in a true research situation would not be valid. Significant dollars are involved however but that might be for another discussion, which sort of ties in with my idea of, is there ethical capitalism? Sadly industrial mentalities and capitalism drive education in US. Mass production testing and text book companies rule along with various support industries.

“I know there are schools that are beating the odds where students are getting better every year, and they are labeled failures, and that can be discouraging and demoralizing,” Arne Duncan

As for US schools being behind are they really? All US schools in all states are mandated through NCLB to have an exit exam that is within certain parameters for graduation and if not passed student does not receive a high school degree. This consists of Writing, Math, Social Studies, and Science portions in the state of Georgia. Many subjects have End of Course Tests again here in Georgia. Even with this series of tests at our high school we have managed to raise graduation rate at our school from 71% to 92% over a five year period. Sadly this comes at the expense of real learning and the idea of teaching to the test is more than a catch word. Teacher’s jobs administrator’s jobs are tied to test scores and funding and state and federal intervention as well. I am not happy with the USA educational system as I am a supporter of students and learning which are totally being left behind in this numerical accountability competitive system.

“We are proceeding on with the intent of the Landmark – Leave No Child Behind Reform Act without political persuasion. The focus is effective delivery of services in education by review, restructure, implementation for maximum student learning.” Arne Duncan

I have taught in different parts of Georgia and in Pa. briefly and while many will say education is not as difficult as in previous generations all I can say is pull a high school or college biology book off the shelf dust it off and compare to a biology book today. The cellular material is years beyond my freshmen college and even zoology and botany books of 1968 and 1969. Not just the research gains but vocabulary and demands of material are voluminous compared to what we had in high school. Our system is flawed and it will take radical thinking I tend to believe more toward Foxfire core practices and John Dewey’s ideas and Carl Rogers because some of his thoughts are good.

“Experience is, for me, the highest authority. The touchstone of validity is my own experience. No other person’s ideas, and none of my own ideas, are as authoritative as my experience. It is to experience that I must return again and again, to discover a closer approximation to truth as it is in the process of becoming in me. Neither the Bible nor the prophets — neither Freud nor research –neither the revelations of God nor man — can take precedence over my own direct experience. My experience is not authoritative because it is infallible. It is the basis of authority because it can always be checked in new primary ways. In this way its frequent error or fallibility is always open to correction.” Carl Rogers, On Becoming a Person, 1961

“The only person who is educated is the one who has learned how to learn and change.” Carl Rogers

As I close looking back on where and when and how I am still my self searching for what is my own pedagogy. It is a continual fluid moving process as I teach and learn each day. I can say I am inclined to think this way but only till a better way comes along. With a morning nearing end and new week ahead please keep all in harms way on your minds and in your hearts.
namaste
bird

Essential Bird Pedagogy Part 2

Bird Droppings August 25, 2010
Essential Bird Pedagogy Part 2

‎ “We would do away with examinations. They measure the inconsequential type of learning. We would do away with grades and credits for the same reason. We would do away with degrees as a measure of competence partly for the same reason. Another reason is that a degree marks the end or a conclusion of something, and the learner is only interested in continuing the process of learning.” Carl Rogers

Sitting at home earlier reading several essays by Carl Rogers made for an interesting start to my morning. In our world of No child Left Behind and being in Special Education where we do see the ones that tend to get left behind I enjoyed the thought of no tests and no grades. Over the years in one graduate class after another the idea of a portfolio following the student through their school career has always intrigued me. As I thought this morning would not some sort of portfolio or culminating, or I should say ongoing project indicate mastery or development of mastery better than a multiple choice test done with a number two pencil on a scantron answer sheet. Of course in chemistry we might have a few explosions if learners were not listening along the way. In my Foxfire understanding what is now Core Practice eight developed into the Foxfire magazine for Elliot Wiggington’s students at Rabun Nantahochee School in 1967 or so. I find it fascinating how often great teachers follow parallel routes different wording and yet seem to find the same ideas. Going back to John Dewey and his premise that experience is the best teacher.

“The work of the classroom serves audiences beyond the teacher, thereby evoking the best efforts by the learners and providing feedback for improving subsequent performances.” Foxfire Core Practice eight

“Learning doesn’t stop at 3:15. You can help the teacher do a better job by encouraging your child to show you something he’s working on at school, suggests Ron Martucci, who teaches fourth grade in Pelham, New York. It doesn’t have to be a big deal: ‘Ask him to demonstrate how he does long division or to read his book report out loud,’ says Martucci. ‘Every time your child gets a chance to show off what he knows, it builds confidence.’” Good Housekeeping, Hearst Publications

“Education is a social process. Education is growth. Education is, not a preparation for life; education is life itself.” John Dewey

Pulling together my first thoughts this morning as I unravel the essential Bird Pedagogy, experience of the learners is a key starting point as I discussed yesterday to a degree. Building on that as the learner progresses trying to find ways that truly show how the learner is developing rather than static limited tests and grades. I like the idea of Rogers about how grades and tests are end points and should be simply points along the line rephrasing a bit as I go. Education is more of a continuum than a finished product. It is sad that so many want to have education be a period at some point. Even as I accumulate degrees I find I am learning constantly not focusing on that end point but where do I go from there.

“Arriving at one goal is the starting point to another.” John Dewey

As I was driving to school this morning a full moon was sitting over me or more so to the left of me as I drove down the highway. I started thinking about what I was going to write today as a continuation of my effort yesterday. My thoughts took me back to a question on my Doctorate Comprehensive exams offered to me by one of my professors and then how I responded. Out of John Dewey came two streams of thought although intertwined. Experiential constructivist thinking and Art or aesthetic based learning. I answered or should say started to answer using Aldus Huxley who had published a book in 1932, Content and Pretexts.

“Experience is not what happens to a man; it is what a man does with what happens to him.” Aldus Huxley, Content and Pretexts

As I read this simple line by Huxley I could not help but go back to my readings on John Dewey and his direct influence on educators and education past, present and future. Dewey saw education as the basis for society.

“I believe that all education proceeds by the participation of the individual in the social consciousness of the race. This process begins unconsciously almost at birth and is continuing shaping the individuals powers saturating his consciousness forming his habits training his ideas, and arousing his feelings and emotions.” John Dewey Pedagogic Creed

In my classroom I try and tie to contextual aspects of which we are the content oriented material that students are being taught. An example would be the word taxonomy that came up a few days ago with a young man in his biology class. He had no clue what this word meant and by some prompting he made a comparison of sheep and goats, his family raises goats he learned about taxonomy. He could show differences and similarities which is how we classify living organisms, or do taxonomy in terms of biology. Going back many years to listening to my father explain tying a square knot you learn best when you actually do it rather than simply hear it explained.
As I explore my own pedagogy I am drawn back to my earliest college and work in psychology. Dr. Abram Maslow developed his hierarchy of needs that I have used over the years many times showing an idea of how people relate and understand in this world of ours. Maslow started with five needs and over the years added some additional clarification.

“Maslow’s five needs
Physiological needs are to do with the maintenance of the human body. If we are unwell, then little else matters until we recover. Safety needs are about putting a roof over our heads and keeping us from harm. If we are rich, strong and powerful, or have good friends, we can make ourselves safe. Belonging needs introduce our tribal nature. If we are helpful and kind to others they will want us as friends. Esteem needs are for a higher position within a group. If people respect us, we have greater power. Self-actualization needs are to ‘become what we are capable of becoming’, which would our greatest achievement. Maslow added over the years three more needs. These are the needs that are most commonly discussed and used. In fact Maslow later added three more needs by splitting two of the above five needs. Between esteem and self-actualization two needs were added. Need to know and understand, which explains the cognitive need of the academic. Also added was the need for aesthetic beauty, which is the emotional need of the artist. Self-actualization was divided into, self-actualization, which is realizing one’s own potential, as above and transcendence, which is helping others to achieve their potential.” Maslow and Lowery, 1998

As I move towards a defining point in my essential Bird Pedagogy bits and pieces of Rogers and Dewey along with Foxfire are intertwined with Maslow’s ideas. We need and seek socialization we are a social animal. We seek recognition and want to be secure in our lives. Maslow in adding cognitive which Rogers uses and aesthetic which Rogers alludes to and Dewey as well as Elliot Eisner builds on. Each day as I sit pondering reflecting on what is my pedagogy my ideas seem to flow a little more freely. I do believe pedagogy is an individual entity and has fluidity to it. There is not an end point or limit or rather there should not be since we need to be ongoing learners and thinkers. Perhaps I will as the week progresses resolve my own ideas and be a bit more definitive in what my personal pedagogy truly is but for today please keep all in harms way on your minds and in your hearts.
namaste
bird

Essential Bird Pedagogy

Bird Droppings August 23-24, 2010
Essential Bird Pedagogy Part 1

“The only person who is educated is the one who has learned how to learn and change.” Dr. Carl Rogers, considered the father of humanistic psychology

Carl Rogers in 1969 published a book, Freedom to Learn. You would think that in a country with mandatory public education including in 1974 education for all children with the passing of IDEA that we were free to learn. As I progress in my understanding of experiential learning and John Dewey’s concepts which are tied to the Foxfire Core Practices and my dissertation I am finding learning is a misunderstood word. Rogers in his writing describes two types of learning. Cognitive learning which he calls meaningless corresponds to such learning as many academic functions where memorization is involved vocabulary or multiplication tables. The other type of learning is experiential learning and Rogers calls this significant learning. The key is that experiential learning addresses the needs and wants of the learner.

“Significant learning takes place when the subject matter is relevant to the personal interests of the student.” Carl Rogers

I titled today’s writing as essential Bird pedagogy and granted this has been a long time in the making. Seldom do I even use the word pedagogy which is a favorite of graduate education schools around the country. Vocabulary word number one as you start a masters or specialist degree. As I think back I still have never used the word other than in papers being turned in where sufficient language and vocabulary of the topic were crucial to the structure and format of the paper. As to why it is essential and why use my own name pedagogy is so often described as a blanketing sort of word. As an example a teacher might say my method of teaching falls within the such and such pedagogy from so forth and so on. Pedagogy is how we teach to paraphrase most definitions. How we teach is a unique aspect of who we are and borrowing from Carl Rogers, I have often thought you can not teach another person how to teach.

“My experience is that I cannot teach another person how to teach. To attempt it is for me, in the long run futile. It seems to me that anything that can be taught to another is relatively inconsequential and has little or no significant influence on behavior. I have come to feel that the only learning which significantly influences behavior is self-discovered self-appropriated learning.” Carl Rogers

As I am reading Carl Rogers words my current research and undertakings in Foxfire lead me back to Core Practice three of the Foxfire Core Practices.

“The work teachers and students do together enables learners to make connections between the classroom work, the surrounding communities, and the world beyond their communities.”

Can I define how I teach, my method in my madness perhaps? I started looking at my own history going back in time and for me now that becomes a foggy glimpse nearly fifty years back when I was in school and when I actually started teaching. All of my early life our family was involved in teaching swimming and Red Cross lifesaving courses. My father was the instructor trainer for the county and as we grew up we went from being students almost sort of evolved into teachers of swimming. Once you attained a certain level of capability my father would have you work one on one with another less adept student.

“Classroom work includes peer teaching, small group work, and teamwork.” Foxfire Core Practice seven

“I find it very rewarding to learn, in groups, in relationships with one person as in therapy, or by myself.” Carl Rogers

“Cooperative/collaborative learning is interactive; as a team member, you: 1. Develop and share a common goal 2. Contribute your understanding of the problem: questions; insights and solutions 3. Respond to, and work to understand, others’ questions, insights and solutions. 4. Each member empowers the other to speak and contribute, and to consider their contributions 5. Are accountable to others, and they are accountable to you 6. Are dependent on others, and they depend on you” Joseph Landsberger, Study Guides and Strategies
As I came up through high school I became a Red Cross instructor and taught swimming and Lifesaving through Boy Scouts, Red Cross and the YMCA. Many of the little tricks of the trade I still use recalling the idioms and anachronisms of my fathers lessons. Sitting on my front counter are little reminder cards FIDO, frequency, intensity, duration and over again. A small card and a simple reminder for students to study although I would add relevance to the learning process as well. My process of becoming a teacher while somewhat planned as I participated in training sessions was very hands on and something I wanted to do.
I started teaching in 1970 or so working in Paoli Pennsylvania with severely disabled children in a private program as in that day and age IDEA was still just a dream. In 1970 many children were not served in public schools. I found it essential to understand the children I was working with and in those days research was still very archaic and for the most part even doctors were recommending residential placement for many of the kids I was working with, as they felt they would never amount to anything anyway. Getting to know a nonverbal child is somewhat of an undertaking and often is an emotional roller coaster. Trying to understand where that child was coming from in their interpretation of the world and how they perceived reality was difficult to say the least. As I look back this aspect of concern and caring was critical to my own development as a teacher and my own essential Bird Pedagogy.

“The belief that all genuine education comes about through experience does not mean that all experiences are genuinely or equally educative.” John Dewey

My teaching and pedagogical journey took me through several colleges and several more teaching jobs which eventually took me to Georgia. In 1975 I began teaching in a small program in Warner Robins Georgia where I was teaching thirteen Learning Disabled teenagers. I was upset as I was handed first and second grade reading books for this group of kids as several were reading on that level. It was just prior to this I found my first Foxfire book in a bookstore in Macon Georgia. Reading the various stories in the Foxfire book and having through my additional reading and own experiences found when something is relevant to a student they tend to learn it far better I needed new reading material for my students.
It was a Monday when I started with magazines of interest to the kids in my class and amazingly enough they went for it. I bought some wrestling, car, hunting and a girl’s magazine or two for my one female student although she was a wrestling fan as well and it changed attitudes and attention spans. By the end of the year reading levels were up and my principal was all ready to order more of her reading books when I broke the news to her. I was not fired and actually was offered a raise and would not have to drive the school bus anymore.

“Significant learning takes place when the subject matter is perceived by the student as having relevance for his own purpose.” Carl Rogers

“From the beginning, learner choice, design, and revision infuses the work teachers and learners do together.” Foxfire Core Practice two

I actually started this topic yesterday but was in and out of meetings, did not get any sleep the night before and then last night I had saved my first paragraphs and notes on my off-line drive and left it at school so here I am finishing in the later hours of the morning what may be a several day effort to describe and define my essential Bird pedagogy. We are in so many ways hoping for a day when fewer people will be in harms way but today it is still a dream. Please join me in keeping all in harms way on your mind and in your hearts.
namaste
bird